Religious Symbols for a Civic Cause

 

Look Who’s Shooting

The photograph shows the irony behind the use of religious symbols to convey a civic statement. Photograph/Vivek Vilasini

The photograph shows the irony behind the use of religious symbols to convey a civic statement. Photograph/Vivek Vilasini.

This story was originally published in April 2011.

“I was fascinated by the fact that in the 21st century, we now need religious symbols to stop people from urinating on the streets.” - Vivek Vilasini.

“I was fascinated by the fact that in the 21st century, we now need religious symbols to stop people from urinating on the streets.”

Kerala-born Vivek Vilasini had his work showcased at an exhibition in Mumbai, called Docu Tour. Vivek, who graduated with a degree in political science before he turned to studying art and sculpture, does documentary as well as staged photography.

The photograph which was showcased in the exhibition was shot near Vivek’s house in Bengaluru. He says, “What drove me towards this image was the fact that the symbols of the most commonly followed religions in our country were being reduced to signs for a basic hygiene message.”

Vivek also feels that the use of black and white not only directs the viewer’s attention to the subject, but also makes the image more impactful. Recently, his work was also showcased at an exhibition called Atopia in Barcelona, Spain along with photographers like David LaChapelle.

– Written by Chandni Gajria

Tags: black and white, Chandni Gajria, Look Who's Shooting, religions, September 2010, signs, symbols, Vivek Vilasini