Flights of Fancy & Photos on the Fly

 
Dinesh Khanna

Dinesh Khanna

Flying may not have the sense of romance that travelling by train does, but once you lose yourself and look towards the skies, there is no greater joy. Both these images were made after landing, while standing on the tarmac, as we were waiting for the airline bus.

“Our ideas may be grand, but it is eventually the smaller details, the tiny moments of serendipity that make photography such a joyride.”

Photograph/Dinesh Khanna

Photograph/Dinesh Khanna

For me, the joy of cellphone photography lies in the simple moments of serendipity that happen when you observe and shoot so many things around you. While making the photograph with the single sliver of a wing, I was thinking of how, despite all our technological progress, we, as humans, are actually quite insignificant. And just as I shot the image, another airplane took off in the distance, amplifying my thoughts. It is only visible as a speck in the final picture, but as a photographer, it is these unplanned moments of magic that make the experience enriching.

Photograph/Dinesh Khanna

Photograph/Dinesh Khanna

There is something about standing on the tarmac and shooting pictures. I do not like airports where you directly enter the airport building through a vestibule. Its like going from one tube into another. I would rather spend a few minutes waiting for the bus, soak in the first feel of a new city and at the same time, quietly walk around a few steps to figure out the best vantage point. It is something you have to decide very quickly, a lot like street photography, come to think of it.

Dinesh Khanna’s career path veered from being a calculator salesman, a garment quality checker, a busboy in a New York bar and a client servicing executive, after which, he finally gave in to his desire to make images. He cofounded the Delhi Photo Festival and regularly conducts ‘addas’ in Delhi to encourage discussions on the medium.

Tags: airplane photography, cellphone photography, Dinesh Khanna, may 2014, Visual Musings