Amit Pasricha: Style Not For Style’s Sake

 
The reason why my book Sacred India is so large is because you have to turn your neck when you look at a picture to appreciate the mood of the place. Photograph/Amit Pasricha

The reason why my book Sacred India is so large is because you have to turn your neck when you look at a picture to appreciate the mood of the place. Photograph/Amit Pasricha

Amit Pasricha may be famous for his panoramas, but strongly believes that the stylistic treatment of a photo should only depend on the subject you are shooting and the way you wish to experience the world. He shares his thoughts with Raj Lalwani.

Photographers often talk about the importance of style. But then, a lot of people adopt an approach or technique, just to be different. Style should never be for style’s sake. It should be something that complements your subject, shows your identity and most importantly, matches the way in which you see the world.

Finding Your Own Voice
I am interested in the way two disparate elements, objects or people come together to form a subtle (or not so subtle) comment. This eventually sums up to something that is larger, more impactful and meaningful. Also, I find the scale of our world completely misrepresented.

One of the best descriptions of the human race for me, is one where we are compared to a colony of ants. We are actually so insignificant, when compared to everything around us. This contradiction excites me. This is what led me to choose the panoramic format. I do not shoot panoramas just because I like the technique or because it makes my pictures different from the others.

I practise this ‘style’ because it represents me, and the way I interact with the world. A style should be a means of personal exploration, and not because that technique is currently popular.

The panoramic format allows me to let the subject relate to his space. However, I’ve become obsessed with the technique, so now I am frightened of it. Photograph/Amit Pasricha

The panoramic format allows me to let the subject relate to his space. However, I’ve become obsessed with the technique, so now I am frightened of it. Photograph/Amit Pasricha

To Document the Ongoing Moment
Photography, for me, is not about the instant moment. It is more about the overall experience. The moment itself, is ongoing. Just imagine… when you visit a new place, do you remember a fleeting second of what you saw, or do you remember the overall experience, of what it felt to look around and be there? A sum of several moments is likely to have a more rounded experience.

Panoramas show a passage of time and I enjoy them because of my complete rejection of a climax as a representative of life. When I build multiplicity of moments, I am driving home the point that ebb and flow is inherent to life.

Photography is often said to be about the moment, but for me, a panorama helps capture a series of moments. Photograph/Amit Pasricha

Photography is often said to be about the moment, but for me, a panorama helps capture a series of moments. Photograph/Amit Pasricha

About Amit Pasricha
Amit Pasricha was born in a family of photographers. After imbibing qualities from his grandfather and father, he carved his own path, in terms of how he makes the viewer experience the final image. This panoramist’s books are grand and ambitious, and his photographs are characterised by the use of storytelling motifs.

 

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