While on a Trek

 

Often, the best way to shoot nature and wildlife is to trek through a conservation area, forest reserve or even your neighbourhood park. Here are a few pointers that can help you spot great opportunities while you walk.

Remain alert and keep your gear handy so that you can shoot as soon as you spot any activity. Photograph/Ambarin Afsar.

Remain alert and keep your gear handy so that you can shoot as soon as you spot any activity. Photograph/Ambarin Afsar.

Explore Various Genres
Since you are out in the open, there is a wide variety of subjects and genres that you can explore when you are out on a trek. From landscapes, skyscapes and waterscapes, to photographing the wonders of nature, treks and trips give you photo opportunities practically every minute. If you are going to a nature park or forest, you can carry along a macro lens to capture close-ups of leaves, flowers, spider webs and insects. On the other hand, if you are trekking up the hills, you may want to use a wide angle lens to capture the stunning views and vistas on offer.

Seasonal Subjects
Depending on the time of year, you may need to look out for different subjects. For instance, in summers, look out for dry leaves that acquire a translucent character due to backlighting. It is also the time when you can spot different birds, so you may wish to carry along a superzoom camera or lens. If it is raining, you may want to capture close-ups of water droplets or simply views of clouds forming on the horizon of a hilltop.

Even busy landscapes can look really nice when the light is right. Photograph/Alok Brahmbhatt.

Even busy landscapes can look really nice when the light is right. Photograph/Alok Brahmbhatt.

Do’s and Don’ts
Do not fall into the trap of shooting anything and everything that comes your way. Move around the place and observe potential subjects. Ask yourself what you can do to make the image interesting. Have patience. At times, the trek may just involve a lot of walking or climbing without any great photo opportunities. Leave for your trek early in the morning, especially in summer. Some places, though, are best visited in the afternoon. Do your research on the internet and try speaking to people who have visited the place before. It is best to travel with a group of like-minded people.

Things to remember
Before leaving for your trip, ensure that you have carried all the equipment you need, be it the camera, lenses or other photographic accessories like memory cards. Of course, that does not mean that you should pack everything you own though. Travel light. If that means only using a kit lens, so be it. Its wide angle and moderate telephoto capabilities are wellsuited to a large range of subjects. Remember to carry a plastic bag and a torch. Wear a pair of good shoes as you may need to walk for long hours through rough terrain. Always carry water and some eatables so that you do not dehydrate yourself and are prepared for challenges.

Tags: accessories, close-ups, Clouds, droplets, eatables, Equipment, Flowers, hilltop, horizon, insects, Kit Lens, Landscapes, leaves, Macro, Memory Cards, Nature, neighbourhood, opportunities, park, plastic bag, reserve, sanctuary, shoes, skyscapes, spider webs, torch, treks, trips, Water, waterscapes, wide angle