Photographing Black and White HDRs

 
Before you begin photographing an HDR image, make sure that your subject or the scene is contrasty. Photograph/Raj Lalwani

Before you begin photographing an HDR image, make sure that your subject or the scene is contrasty. Photograph/Raj Lalwani

Your Camera Does Not Matter
When people think about High Dynamic Range images, they equate it with colour photographs that are eye-popping and vibrant. But, HDR is also a very effective tool for B&W photography as well.

The good thing about creating an HDR image is that it is not dependent on a particular device. Your DSLR, compact camera and even your cellphone’s camera can shoot great HDRs, provided that you download an app that lets your bracket for exposure in the latter.

So don’t worry if you think that your device is incapable of capturing a wide variety of tones. That is the whole point of shooting in HDR.

Capturing the Finer Details
Most of us don’t really pay attention to the different shades of grey in black and white photographs. This is largely because most cameras are not equipped to capture the mid tone grey areas that often habour tiny details and textures.

For instance, pay attention to how the sun lights up the different crevices and contours on a boulder. By shooting in HDR, all these tiny nooks and crannies will be highlighted.

When making B&W HDR images, you can control the intensity and gradation of tones, from black to white. Photograph/Raj Lalwani

When making B&W HDR images, you can control the intensity and gradation of tones, from black to white. Photograph/Raj Lalwani

 

Creating a Realistic Rendition
HDR does not always have to mean high definition or high contrast photographs. You can use it and still remain subtle.

One example is using HDR to prevent a few highlights from getting blown out in the image, or maybe to reveal an interesting subject that is hidden in shadows However, be cautious about the extent of its usage, because you don’t want your viewer to notice that the final image is an HDR rendition.

Not Overdoing It
Ensure that you don’t go overboard with the tones in your HDR photograph. As it is, your picture will contain strong tones. You don’t want to overdo it by increasing the saturation and contrast to the extent where the final result looks cartoony or unrealistic.

Use a Dedicated Software
You can create HDR photographs using Photoshop. However, a specially designed software like Photomatix will give you more tools and options to create a betterlooking image.

Tags: April 2015, black and white, Camera, contrast, Dynamic, Features, HDR, highlights, photography, photomatix, photoshop, Realistic, saturation, software, technique, Tips & Tricks