Illuminate Your World

 

With Elinchrom’s lighting solutions, great imagery is just a click away!

Photograph/Joshua Navalkar

Photograph/Joshua Navalkar

Basics of Portraiture Lighting
A D-Lite RX 2 was used as a frontal light at a 45° angle with a Portalite softbox to illuminate the subject. Another D-Lite 2 with a beauty dish acted as the side light to enhance the facial features.

Photograph/Mexy Xavier, Better Interiors

Photograph/Mexy Xavier, Better Interiors

Pay Attention to Every Object
Nine lights were used for this image to light the room evenly and showcase the furniture and decor. When shooting complex interiors such as this one, use lights to highlight individual objects and groups depending on how the shadows fall.

Photograph/Suresh Narayanan, Better Photography

Photograph/Suresh Narayanan, Better Photography

Slow Shutter Action Shots
A slow shutterspeed captured the trails. The lights were triggered at the end of the exposure to freeze the action. An FRX 400 with a softbox provided frontal illumination. Another FRX 400 with a standard reflector behind the bike created the sharp, elongated shadows. Barn Doors helped prevent the light from spreading. Three FRX 200s with snoots and red gelatin paper were used in the background, for added interest.

Photograph/Ketan Kundargi, Better Photography

Photograph/Ketan Kundargi, Better Photography

Catch All the Action
This photograph has been made below a bridge using the ultra portable Quadra lighting system. One Ranger Q Head on a Floor Stand, connected to the Ranger RX Quadra Asymmetric Battery Pack was used for the shot. The fast recycle time and quick and powerful burst of light allowed us to capture multiple images of this action and choose the best one.

Photograph/Nachiket Gujjar, MFP Magazine

Photograph/Nachiket Gujjar, MFP Magazine

Escape Any Unpleasing Shadows
A D-Lite RX 4 with a soft box was used to illuminate the cookies. A second D-Lite RX 4 with a background reflector was used to create the halo in the background. A D-Lite RX 1 was used as a fill to prevent the underside of the top cookie from creating a shadow.

Photograph/Neha Mithbawkar, T3

Photograph/Neha Mithbawkar, T3

Create Drama
While a D-Lite RX 2, used as a frontal light, illuminated the watch. A second RX 2 with a snoot and grid, placed at a top angle diagonally, was used to create the contrast lighting on the rocks.

Photograph/Neha Mithbawkar, Better Interiors

Photograph/Neha Mithbawkar, Better Interiors

Appetising Food Photography
One FRX 200 kept at a 45° angle at the height of the cocktails was used to light up the image. Another light at a higher intensity, placed by the side at a 45° angle, was used to create highlights that make these drinks appetising. Photograph/Neha Mithbawkar, Better Interiors

Photograph/Neha Mithbawkar, Better Photography

Photograph/Neha Mithbawkar, Better Photography

Working With Groups
The setup for this image was changed for the final photo. For the final setup, two FRX 400 lights with softboxes placed slightly higher than the subjects were used to evenly light the subjects from both sides. A D-Lite RX 4 with a honeycomb grid was placed behind the subjects to act as a hairlight. A second D-Lite RX 4 with a reflector dish was used to create the halo in the background to highlight the subject.

Photograph/Mexy Xavier, AV Max

Photograph/Mexy Xavier, AV Max

Create Blurred Abstract Backgrounds
This shot was taken with a slow shutterspeed to capture the blurs in the background. An FRX 400 was used with a Rotalux softbox as a frontal light. A second light placed at a higher level at a 45° angle was used to create the highlights. A third light placed in the background was triggered manually multiple times while moving the curtain. The flashes retained some of the sharp details while the light from the modelling lamp formed the abstract blurs.

Photograph/Joshua Navalkar, AV Max

Photograph/Joshua Navalkar, AV Max

Shooting Reflective Surfaces
Using floor stands two D-Lite RX 2s were placed at 30° angles to illuminate the image. When shooting reflective material, such as this one, if you find that harsh highlights are being formed, you can also choose to bounce the light off the ceiling or the wall.

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Tags: better photography, Elinchrom, Food Photography, lighting, photoquip, portraits, Rotalux, Shooting Technique, studio lighting, travel kit, Varistar Reflector