Grace in Curves

 
The angle at which the picture is shot captures a wave like curve of the building which conveys a sense of movement." Photography/Amber Khanna

The angle at which the picture is shot captures a wave like curve of the building which conveys a sense of movement.” Photography/Amber Khanna

Curving lines can help you render a sense of rhythm, grace and movement in your photographs.

Imagine a winding road that starts from the summit of a valley and leads the traveller all the way up to the peak of the mountain. Such meandering curves can have a hypnotic effect on viewers. Whenever there are curving lines in an image, the eye is compelled to follow them.These can be found in natural elements like leaves, flowers, lakes, waves, shorelines and even in modern architectural buildings. You could even consider the human body posed in the form of a curve. Radial forms, like a leading staircase, are a part of curves and based on the direction they are in, they can amplify movement.

The S-curve
Essentially, a line in the shape of an ā€˜Sā€™, the S-curve, can lead the viewer in or out of a scene. A pathway of trees in a forest or a river often are in the shape of an S.

This curve shape works better when placed towards the right side of the frame. If you look at the image vertically, the S-curve tends to split the frame and balance the picture in a pleasing manner.

This article originally appeared in the July 2013 issue of Better Photography.

Tags: Shooting Technique, photography, photographer, movement, Flowers, waves, natural elements, july 2013, Grace in Curves, building, conveys, Amber Khanna, lakes, modern, architectural buildings