Create Foreground Drama

 

While it is very important to pay attention to what is going on in the background, it is equally important to concentrate on the foreground as well, in order to make impactful images. Learn how you can use elements in the foreground to your advantage and create a sense of drama.

Using a wide-angle lens has increased the diminishing perspective, which makes the lines of the railway track appear to be joining at end. Photograph/John Nyberg.

Using a wide-angle lens has increased the diminishing perspective, which makes the lines of the railway track appear to be joining at end. Photograph/John Nyberg.

Play with Perspective
You can either diminish your perspective or photograph in a way that it expands your perspective. To make this concept much clear, imagine how a field of flowers can stretch into infinity if you focus on the area that is closer to your lens. Focusing on what is in the foreground will expand the area beyond and make the field look larger and never-ending. Furthermore, you could use lines to diminish the perspective of the viewer. Notice how from a distance, two railway tracks merge at a single point even when we know that they are not. Fences, telephone lines, or any two parallel lines are best to highlight this diminishing perspective.

Shooting from a low vantage point has made the sun look smaller than it actually is. Photograph/Jose Interface.

Shooting from a low vantage point has made the sun look smaller than it actually is. Photograph/Jose Interface.

Achieve Sharp Foregrounds
Focusing on foreground elements works well with landscapes and architectural shots too. Keep in mind the size and comparison of the two or more objects that you want to photograph. Add depth to your image by keeping the object in the background slightly visible to bring out a sense of scale. For example, you can focus on the fl ower in the foreground and keep the monument in the background blurred. Low vantage points are also useful in shooting architectural elements. Achieve a sharp foreground by shooting at a lower f-number or use a prime lens like a 50mm that allows you to shoot at f/1.4 or f/1.8. For greater control, use manual focus.

The foreground brings attention to the shadows. Additionally, the faint view of the mountains convey the distance between the two subjects. Photograph/Mullenkuzhy Shobi.

The foreground brings attention to the shadows. Additionally, the faint view of the mountains convey the distance between the two subjects. Photograph/Mullenkuzhy Shobi.

Get Funny
Take a picture where you have someone stand closer to the camera and someone standing at double the distance of the camera. The use of a wide angle will exaggerate the size of the object and make the objects in the distance appear much smaller than they are. Thus, the person closer to the camera appears a giant where as the person further from the camera will look like a midget. Use this technique to make a person look like he is ‘eating’ the sun or to make someone appear taller than a building!

Tags: architecture, background, converging, diminishing, drama, foreground, humour, hyperfocal distance, Landscapes, lines, manual focus, parallel, Perspective, sharp