Conceptualising Your Indoor Shoot

 
Using tints, shades and tones of the same colour as the subject, can help emphasise its presence. Photograph/Gurdas Dua

Using tints, shades and tones of the same colour as the subject, can help emphasise its presence. Photograph/Gurdas Dua

Stuck indoors? Here’s how you can make compelling photographs at home.

Find Your Muse
Before you dive headfirst into starting the setup for a shoot, try deciding the mood of the intended photograph first.

Whether it is a song that you have been listening to or a book that you have just finished reading, replay it in your head and think about how you would photograph it.You can even try to recreate a photograph that inspires you.

Pen it Down
While conceptualising, make sure you put down all the details on paper. Make a rough sketch of your frames. Try using stick figures if you can’t draw to save your life. However, attention to detail is absolutely critical at this stage. Be it a shade of lipstick or the number of jars— label it all, everything is important.

Think of these points as blueprints that you can keep referring to on the day of the shoot. They will also help you decide key factors such as equipment required, the kind of background needed, the type of lighting to be used, your budget for the shoot and so on.

Repeating a single pattern and breaking it with the placement of contrasting objects can create a very stimulating visual. Photograph/Dharmesh B. Pancha

Repeating a single pattern and breaking it with the placement of contrasting objects can create a very stimulating visual. Photograph/Dharmesh B. Pancha

Your Colour Palette
While creating a composition, try thinking of the colours you want to fill it with. You can make moody or dramatic compositions by using complementary or even contrasting colours.

Just remember that you can’t always control the colour of your subject. For instance, you can’t turn an apple blue. What you can do is, use other colours that might go well with that particular shade of red of the apple.

Arrange regular objects to make edgy compositions. Photograph/Dominic Morel

Arrange regular objects to make edgy compositions. Photograph/Dominic Morel

Recheck the Frame for Play of Light
We often miss shadows that our camera tends to catch. It is because our eyes are optically a lot smarter and thus moderate light better.

Once you are happy with the frame, you can crosscheck the manner in which light is entering your frame on the LCD screen by switching to black and white. You will read the highlights and shadows a lot more clearly, without any colours distracting you. If the need arises you can adjust the lighting and then switch back to the colour mode.

This article originally appeared in the June 2014 issue of Better Photography.

Tags: indoor shoot, photography at home